Keller: “Sproul Was Driscoll Before Mark Driscoll”

Tim Keller gave a series of lectures on preaching at Reformed Theological Seminary (my alma mater). After the first session, “What Is Good Preaching?” Keller followed up with a Q and A. Someone asked who were Keller’s influences on how to be a good preacher. Along with George Whitefield, Martin Lloyd-Jones, John Stott, Dick Lucas and Sinclair Ferguson, Keller mentioned R.C. Sproul, saying he was the “Driscoll before Mark Driscoll.”

I’ll never think of R.C. Sproul (or Mark Driscoll) the same way again.

Driscoll and the Complicit Reformed Leaders

Carl Trueman, writing in First Things,

And then, finally, there is the silence. The one thing that might have kept the [young, restless and reformed] movement together would imgreshave been strong, transparent public leadership that openly policed itself and thus advertised its integrity for all to see. Yet the most remarkable thing about the whole sorry saga, from the [T.D.] Jakes business until now, has been the silence of many of the men who present themselves as the leaders of the movement and who were happy at one time to benefit from Mark Driscoll’s reputation and influence. One might interpret this silence as an appropriate refusal to comment directly on the ministry of men who no longer have any formal connection with their own organizations.

Read the article here.

The Atlantic on Driscoll: Who’s Promoting Who?

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Pastor Mark Driscoll preaches at Mars Hill Church in Seattle. (AP)

The Atlantic:

Mars Hill Church spent $210,000 getting its pastor’s book to the top of the New York Times best-seller list. Where is the line between a pastor promoting his own career and promoting the ministry of his church?

Fair question.

I usually avoid the comment section in these types of articles. However, commenter Wendy Alsup (a former member of Mars Hill Church) astutely notes,

This statement in the article is incorrect. “… emphasizing that all profits from Driscoll’s book sales have always gone to the church.” The BOAA statement said only that profits of books sold AT MARS HILL CHURCH go back to the church. Mark received royalties for books sold outside of the church.

I’m not following this story’s every nuance, but I’d call that a serious omission.

Read the article here.